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How To Treat Baker’s Cyst With Acupuncture and TCM

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By Qineng Tan, L.Ac., Ph.D. and Xiaomei Cai, L.Ac., Ph.D.

 

knee pain Baker
Baker’s cyst may cause pain and swelling in the knee joint.

Swelling behind knee, lump behind knee, pain and swelling behind knee, knee stiffness? These can be Baker’s cyst symptoms. A Baker’s cyst in knee joint occurs when swelling in the knee forms a fluid-filled sac. Acupuncture treatment can help relieve Bakers cyst knee symptoms like knee pain and stiffness.

A Baker cyst, also known as a popliteal cyst, or synovial cyst, is a fluid-filled growth that develops in the back of the knee joint. In some cases, a Baker’s cyst causes knee pain, stiffness, and swelling; in other cases, there may be no Baker’s cyst signs and symptoms at all.

What causes Baker’s cyst? Usually, it is due to a knee injury, such as a cartilage tear, or arthritis in the knee joint. These types of problems cause inflammation in the knee, which can lead to the production of more synovial fluid than usual.

Synovial fluid is a thick, clear substance, similar to egg whites in consistency, that is present in the joints of the body to help lubricate their movements. It is produced by the synovium, a sort of bubble that surrounds joints like the knees, elbows, shoulders, and hips. 

When the synovium becomes swollen and inflamed, due to injury or overuse of the joint, it may produce excess synovial fluid. In the case of a Baker’s cyst, the synovial fluid can build up in the knee joint, and form a bump, lump, or growth in the back of the knee.

People who have a history of knee injury, osteoarthritis, or rheumatoid arthritis may be more prone to developing Baker’s cysts.

Bakers cyst treatment is usually only indicated if a person is experiencing significant pain or limitation of movement. Acupuncture treatment can provide an adjunct or alternative Baker’s cyst therapy to help promote healing and relieve Baker’s knee symptoms.

 

Top 5 Baker’s Cyst Symptoms

 

baker
Repetitive movements or sports injuries can sometimes lead to Baker’s cyst later on.
Photo by Jenny Hill on Unsplash

Many people have a baker’s cyst knee without realizing it. If there is no pain, a person may not notice the lump behind knee. 

 

Baker’s cyst signs and symptoms include:

 

  1. Knee pain, pain in the back of the knee
  2. Knee stiffness, stiff knee joint, especially when straightening the leg
  3. Swollen knee, swelling in knee joint
  4. Swelling goes away when knee is bent
  5. Pain and stiffness are worse after standing for a long time

 

More severe baker’s cyst symptoms could include redness and swelling, as the cyst gets larger. 

In some cases, a baker’s cyst can rupture. If this happens, there may be swelling, redness, and a warm sensation in the calf area. Rupture of a baker’s cyst could cause pain or numbness in the calf, lack of blood flow to the lower leg, as the ruptured cyst could trap a nerve or artery in the knee or lower leg.

In extreme cases, a ruptured Baker’s cyst could lead to compartment syndrome, which could cause intense pain, foot drop, edema in the lower leg, and possibly, even an inability to move the foot or toes. If you believe your Baker’s cyst has ruptured, you should seek emergency care.

While, in most cases, a Baker’s cyst will eventually go on on its own, it is best to get a diagnosis and discuss your options. Acupuncture and TCM offer treatment of Baker’s cysts that is non-invasive and can help improve healing and prevent regrowth of the cyst.

 

Baker’s Cyst Treatment

 

Baker’s cyst signs and symptoms can be similar to those of a blood clot, or even a tumor. So, while a doctor can often diagnose a Baker’s cyst simply by palpating the area, they may also order imaging tests to be sure.

In many cases, doctors will prescribe over the counter pain medications and allow time for the cyst to go away on its own. You may be advised to limit activities that might aggravate the knee inflammation. Resting and elevating the knee for a few weeks might be recommended.

In some cases, a doctor may give cortisone injections to reduce knee swelling, or perform needle aspiration to drain the fluid from the cyst.

Surgery is generally only suggested in situations in which the knee pain has become chronic and inflammation does not seem to be going away.

Unfortunately, these medical treatments for Baker’s cyst may help bring relief, but it is quite common for the Baker’s cyst to come back again. Acupuncture treatment is not only a good way to bring symptomatic relief, but can help prevent the recurrence of Baker’s cysts.

Acupuncture has long been considered an excellent modality for treating knee pain due to all types of conditions. TCM offers an adjunct  or alternative treatment for knee pain, without side effects that can come with pain medications or steroids.

 

Can Acupuncture Help Baker’s Cyst?

 

acupuncture for Baker
Acupuncture treatment for knee pain and swelling.

Acupuncture and TCM treatments with Chinese herb formulas have been used for centuries to treat knee injuries of all kinds. 

According to TCM theory, arthritis in the knee that causes pain and stiffness is caused by stagnation that blocks the smooth flow of blood and Qi (life force energy). Acupuncture and herbs are used to address the underlying causes of blockages.

Injuries like a torn meniscus in the knee, or damage to the cartilage of the knee are very common, and it is also common for a person who has suffered such an injury to develop a Baker’s cyst later on. Full healing of cartilage can be helped with specific herbs that bring more nutrients to the damaged tissues.

Once a pattern of inflammation has begun, it can be difficult to get the swelling to go away. Small movements can trigger the inflammatory response if the area is not fully healed, and if other lifestyle habits are also causing a person to be prone to inflammation.

Chinese medicine looks at the situation holistically, treating the situation with acupuncture treatment, cupping, herbs, and nutrition, so that overall inflammation is reduced, and swelling and pressure is reduced, as well.

Herbal patches that are applied topically may be used in addition to herbal teas taken internally, to help relieve knee pain and swelling.

Cupping can also be helpful for healing and prevention of Baker’s cysts. One study compared patients with a popliteal cysts who were treated with acupuncture and cupping to patients who were given injections of prednisone. Both groups had high rates of effectiveness in terms of relief from the cysts, but recurrence of Baker’s cyst was significantly lower in the group that received TCM treatment as opposed to steroids.

Acupuncture Near Me for Baker’s Cyst, Los Angeles, CA

 

If you or someone you know has been suffering from knee pain and stiffness, due to a knee injury, arthritis, or diagnosed with Baker’s cysts on knee, it is worth seeking help from an acupuncturist experienced in working with orthopedic injuries, like Dr. Tan at Art of Wellness in West Los Angeles. TCM treatment for Baker’s cyst and other problems with the knee joint can not only help to relieve pain and increase range of movement; it can help prevent knee pain from coming back in the future. 





*This article is for education from the perspective of Traditional Chinese Medicine only. The education provided by this article is not approved by FDA to diagnose, prevent, treat and cure human diseases. It should not stop you from consulting with your physician for your medical conditions. Traditional Chinese Medicine is based on Qi, which is an invisible force that usually cannot be observed by modern science. Because science focuses on testing ideas about the natural world with evidence obtained through observation, these aspects of acupuncture can’t be studied by science. Therefore acupuncture and Chinese herbs are often not supported by double-blind, randomized trials, and they are considered alternative medicine therapies in the United States.

 





 

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How to Treat CRPS With Acupuncture and TCM

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By Qineng Tan, L.Ac., Ph.D. and Xiaomei Cai, L.Ac., Ph.D.

 

CRPS complex regional pain syndrome
Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) involves chronic pain, usually in an arm or leg.

Chronic pain, changes in skin temperature, and swelling in a specific limb or body part? Pain, swollen limbs, edema and inflammation after a seemingly minor injury? These could be signs of a condition known as Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS). Acupuncture and TCM can help relieve chronic pain due to CRPS.

CRPS is a relatively rare condition that usually causes pain and inflammation in an arm or leg. It most often occurs after someone experiences an injury to a limb, or has surgery on one of their limbs. The painful area may be swollen, turn red and hot sometimes, and blue and cold at other times. 

CRPS is marked by pain that seems disproportionate to the injury or outside stimulus. For example, a person with CRPS may feel severe pain when the affected area is touched lightly, or when a breeze blows. While CRPS is not fully understood by medical science, it is generally considered to be a neurological disorder.

While most cases of CRPS do improve in the long run, there may be a long period of time during which the injured area seems to be getting more inflamed. 

CRPS pain may worsen and spread to involve more of the affected limb. In some cases, the pain may even be “mirrored” in the opposite limb. This is partially why CRPS is theorized to be caused by problems with the nervous system.

Sometimes CRPS manifests without any evidence of nerve damage. This condition is known as CRPS-I, or Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy Syndrome. (RSD or RSDS).

Some cases of CRPS can be associated with proven nerve damage; this is called “causalgia,” or CRPS-II.

Conventional Western medicine approaches primarily focus on managing symptoms with pain medications and physical therapy. In some cases, CRPS pain can be so severe that it causes disability, as the person cannot use their limb normally in daily activities.

Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) and acupuncture can help address the root causes of CRPS. Acupuncture and TCM offer a holistic approach to relieve pain and enhance overall well-being.

 

Top 5 Symptoms of Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS)

CRPS chronic pain
Prolonged pain and inflammation are symptoms of CRPS.

CRPS symptoms can change. A CRPS flare up may last days or weeks, when pain and swelling get worse. Sometimes, the pain may seem to come out of nowhere; other times, it may be triggered by exertion, stress, or other factors.

 

  1. Intense and prolonged pain: Individuals with CRPS experience severe and persistent pain that may seem disproportionate to the initial injury or cause. There may be “pins and needles” or a burning sensation. Light contact with something may cause severe pain; this phenomenon is known as “allodynia.” Or something that would usually cause mild pain, like a pin prick, causes severed pain; this is called “hyperalgesia.”
  2. Changes in skin temperature and color: The affected area may become warmer or cooler compared to the surrounding areas, and skin may appear blotchy, pale, red, or blue or gray.
  3. Swelling and sensitivity: Swelling, edema, and increased sensitivity to touch or even a slight breeze are common symptoms of CRPS.
  4. Limited range of motion: Stiffness, muscle weakness, and difficulty moving the affected limb or body part may occur. There may be tremors or jerky motions of the limb. 
  5. Changes in skin texture, hair and nail growth: Abnormal hair and nail growth patterns, such as excessive hair growth or brittle nails, may develop in the affected area. The skin may become thinner or thicker, or may be shiny or scaly.

CRPS may cause unusually heavy sweating in the affected area, or cause there to be a total absence of sweating in the area.

 

Medical Treatment for CRPS

In the realm of conventional medicine, Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS) is understood as a multifaceted condition that often arises following an injury or trauma to a limb or body part. While the exact cause of CRPS is not fully understood, it is believed to involve abnormal responses of the central and peripheral nervous systems. Nerve damage, inflammation, and changes in blood flow are thought to play a role in the development of CRPS.

Certain risk factors may increase an individual’s susceptibility to the condition, such as a history of fractures, surgery, or repetitive motion injuries. Additionally, psychological factors and genetic predisposition may contribute to the development of CRPS. 

CRPS can be triggered by a variety of factors, including surgery, immobilization, infections, emotional stress and trauma.

Diagnostic testing for CRPS may include a bone scan, x-rays, MRI, and a sweat production test. 

Medications recommended may include pain relievers, corticosteroids to help bring down inflammation, and nerve blocking injections. Low doses of ketamine are sometimes used to help relieve pain. Topical analgesics may help reduce sensitivity in the affected area, as may heat therapy.

Other therapies for CRPS may include biofeedback and transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS). Mirror therapy, in which a person stands or sits in front of a mirror set-up that tricks the brain into thinking it sees the injured limb working the way the healthy limb does, can be helpful for retraining the nervous system.

Acupuncture treatment for CRPS can work on multiple levels to help relieve pain, improve motor function, reduce inflammation, help heal nerves, and reduce stress.

 

Can Acupuncture Help CRPS?

acupuncture chronic pain
Acupuncture can help relieve pain and inflammation.

In Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS) is understood as a disruption in the flow of Qi (energy) and Blood in the affected area, leading to pain and dysfunction. According to TCM theory, the underlying causes of CRPS are often related to the stagnation of Qi and Blood, as well as the blockage of meridians (energy channels) that run through the affected limb or body part. TCM treatments aim to restore the smooth flow of Qi and Blood, harmonize the body’s internal balance, and alleviate pain.

Acupuncture, a key component of TCM, is believed to stimulate specific acupoints along the meridians, helping to regulate the nervous system’s response and promote healing. Chinese herbal medicine is also commonly used in TCM to support the treatment of CRPS by addressing underlying imbalances and promoting overall well being. By addressing both the physical and energetic aspects of the condition, TCM aims to restore harmony and alleviate pain in individuals with CRPS.

One study looked at two soldiers whose upper extremities were injured in combat and were later diagnosed with CRPS. When conventional methods did not help relieve pain, they were given one or two acupuncture treatments per week for a few weeks. They had 80% improvement in pain and functionality and with no recurrence at a 20-month follow up.

An individual case study of a 34-year-old with CRPS showed improvement in pain and emotional well-being after a series of acupuncture treatments.

When dealing with Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS), incorporating certain lifestyle changes, behavioral adjustments, dietary modifications, and home remedies can be beneficial in managing the condition. Here are some recommendations:

Stress Management: Practicing stress-reducing techniques such as deep breathing exercises, meditation, and mindfulness can help alleviate CRPS symptoms. Stress management techniques promote relaxation and can positively impact pain perception.

  • Gentle Exercise: Engaging in low-impact exercises like walking, swimming, or yoga can help improve blood circulation, maintain joint flexibility, and reduce muscle stiffness. It is important to consult with a healthcare professional or physical therapist to determine the most appropriate exercise program for your specific situation.
  • Heat and Cold Therapy: Applying heat packs or cold compresses to the affected area may provide temporary relief from pain and inflammation. Experiment with both methods to see which works best for you. Remember to protect your skin and avoid extreme temperatures.
  • Balanced Diet: Maintaining a healthy and well-balanced diet is crucial for overall well-being. Include nutrient-rich foods such as fruits, vegetables, whole grains, lean proteins, and healthy fats. Avoid excessive consumption of processed foods, refined sugars, and caffeine, as they may contribute to inflammation and worsen symptoms.
  • Adequate Hydration: Staying hydrated is important for promoting optimal bodily function and supporting overall health. Aim to drink an adequate amount of water throughout the day to keep your body hydrated and support proper circulation.
  • Stress Reduction: CRPS symptoms can be exacerbated by stress. Engaging in activities that promote relaxation, such as hobbies, listening to soothing music, spending time in nature, or engaging in creative outlets, can help reduce stress levels and improve overall well-being.
  • Sleep Hygiene: Getting sufficient and quality sleep is essential for managing chronic pain conditions. Establish a regular sleep routine, create a comfortable sleep environment, and practice good sleep hygiene habits like avoiding electronic devices before bed.

It’s important to note that these lifestyle changes, behavioral adjustments, dietary modifications, and home remedies should complement your comprehensive treatment plan and be tailored to your individual needs. Consult with a healthcare professional or a qualified practitioner of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) for personalized guidance and recommendations based on your specific condition and symptoms.

 

Acupuncture Near Me for CRPS in Los Angeles and Santa Monica

At Art of Wellness Acupuncture in West L.A., we have over 35 years of experience treating neurological conditions and chronic pain of all kinds. Acupuncture is a modality that is particularly suited to treating conditions like CRPS, where it may be difficult to find relief through conventional treatment methods. If you are experiencing excessive pain in one of your limbs, with temperature sensitivity and inflammation, it may be worth seeking out alternative treatment with TCM.



 

*This article is for education from the perspective of Traditional Chinese Medicine only. The education provided by this article is not approved by FDA to diagnose, prevent, treat and cure human diseases. It should not stop you from consulting with your physician for your medical conditions. Traditional Chinese Medicine is based on Qi, which is an invisible force that usually cannot be observed by modern science. Because science focuses on testing ideas about the natural world with evidence obtained through observation, these aspects of acupuncture can’t be studied by science. Therefore acupuncture and Chinese herbs are often not supported by double-blind, randomized trials, and they are considered alternative medicine therapies in the United States.









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How to Treat Hiatal Hernia With Acupuncture and TCM

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By Qineng Tan, L.Ac., Ph.D. and Xiaomei Cai, L.Ac., Ph.D.

 

hiatal hernia abdomen
Hiatal hernia develops in the upper abdomen

Heartburn and acid reflux? Chest pain or abdominal pain? Vomiting blood, black stool, dark poop? These can be hiatal hernia symptoms. Acupuncture and TCM offer an adjunct or alternative hernia treatment to help relieve hernia pain.

A hernia is what happens when an organ, usually in the abdomen or groin area, pushes through the muscle tissue that surrounds it.

A hiatal hernia occurs when the stomach pushes through the diaphragm—the large muscle that separates your abdomen from your chest. 

There is a small opening in the diaphragm—called the “hiatus”— that allows the esophagus to pass through the muscle wall before it connects to the stomach. When a hiatal hernia occurs, the upper part of the stomach pushes through that opening.

It is possible to have a mild hernia and not know it, as it may not cause any pain or other hernia symptoms. A more serious hiatal hernia, though, will cause stomach acid and undigested food to move back up into the esophagus, causing heartburn and possibly chest pain or abdominal pain.

Sometimes it is possible to actually see a hernia, as it may bulge out of the abdomen. Sometimes you can only see it when you cough, or do something strenuous, or even simply stand up.

 

Hiatal Hernia Symptoms

hernia symptoms
Hiccuping or regurgitation of acid and food are hiatal hernia symptoms

The most common signs of hiatal hernia include:

  • Heartburn and acid reflux: One of the most common symptoms of a hiatal hernia is a burning sensation in the chest due to the regurgitation of stomach acid into the esophagus.

 

  • Chest pain: Some people with a hiatal hernia may experience chest pain that can mimic the symptoms of a heart attack. The pain is often described as a dull, squeezing, or pressure-like sensation.

 

  • Difficulty swallowing: A hiatal hernia can lead to a narrowing of the esophagus, making it difficult to swallow. Individuals may feel a sensation of food getting stuck or feel like they’re choking.

 

  • Belching and hiccups: burping or persistent hiccuping can occur, due to pressure on the diaphragm.

 

  • Regurgitation: In addition to heartburn, people with a hiatal hernia may experience the backflow of food or sour liquid into the mouth.

 

  • Chest discomfort after eating: Some people may experience a burning sensation, pressure, or feeling of fullness in the chest area after eating, because the stomach is pressing into the chest cavity.

 

  • Shortness of breath: Larger hiatal hernias can put pressure on the diaphragm and lungs, leading to difficulty breathing, especially during physical exertion.

 

  • Fatigue and weakness: Chronic symptoms of a hiatal hernia can disrupt sleep, resulting in fatigue.

Hiatal hernias are quite common; they may affect as many as half of all people over 50. Hernias may happen because of a generally weakening of muscle tissues.

Hernias can also occur because of some trauma or injury to the area; some hernias happen after a surgical procedure, due to incisions or scar tissue. 

It is also possible to develop a hernia during pregnancy or after giving birth.

In many cases, hernia surgery is considered necessary to treat a hernia that is causing symptoms. Acupuncture and TCM treatment offer a way to treat hiatal hernias that may, in some cases, help people avoid a hernia operation.

 

Top 10 Types of Hernia

pregnancy hernia
Hernias can occur during pregnancy or childbirth.

While hiatal hernia and inguinal hernia are the most common types of hernia, there are several other types of hernia, classified mainly according to where in the body they occur.

 

  1. Hiatal Hernia: a portion of the stomach protrudes through the diaphragm into the chest cavity, often leading to symptoms like heartburn, chest pain, and difficulty swallowing.
  2. Inguinal Hernia: Inguinal hernias are the most common type and occur when part of the intestine or abdominal tissue pushes through a weak spot or tear in the lower abdominal wall, often in the inguinal canal. The inguinal canal acts as a passageway for the round ligament of the uterus in women and for the gonadal vessels in men. Inguinal hernias are more common in men and may cause a bulge or swelling in the groin or scrotum.
  3. Umbilical Hernia: Umbilical hernias occur when the tissue or intestines protrude through a weak spot near the navel (belly button). This type of hernia is more common in infants but can also occur in adults, especially those who are overweight or have had multiple pregnancies.
  4. Ventral Hernia: Ventral hernias develop in the abdominal wall, often at the site of a previous surgical incision. They can occur when the tissue or intestines push through weakened abdominal muscles, causing a bulge or protrusion.
  5. Epigastric Hernia: Epigastric hernias appear in the upper abdomen, between the navel and the breastbone. They occur when fatty tissue pushes through weak areas in the abdominal muscles, resulting in a small bump or bulge.
  6. Groin Hernia or Femoral Hernia: This term is often used to refer to inguinal hernias, which are the most common type of groin hernia. However, it can also encompass other hernias that occur in the groin area, such as femoral hernias. Femoral hernias can sometimes happen due to straining while having a bowel movement.
  7. Spigelian Hernia: Spigelian hernias are relatively rare and occur along the edge of the abdominal wall, typically below the navel. These hernias may be difficult to diagnose due to their location and can cause pain and discomfort.
  8. Incisional Hernia: An incisional hernia occurs at the site of a previous surgical incision, where the tissue or intestines protrude through the weakened area. It is more common in individuals who have undergone abdominal surgery.
  9. Diaphragmatic Hernia: Diaphragmatic hernias occur when abdominal organs, such as the stomach or intestines, protrude through a defect in the diaphragm. This type of hernia can be congenital or acquired and may cause symptoms such as difficulty breathing and chest pain.
  10. Sports Hernia: Also known as athletic pubalgia, a sports hernia refers to soft tissue injuries or tears in the groin area, specifically affecting the muscles, tendons, or ligaments. It is commonly associated with sports that involve sudden twisting movements, such as soccer or hockey.

Another type of hernia can occur in the back part of the body. You have probably also heard of a “herniated disc.” This condition, which is also known as a “bulging disk,” “prolapsed disc,” “ruptured disc,” or “slipped disc,” is a herniation that occurs between the spinal vertebrae.

There are discs made of cartilage that sit between the vertebrae, which provide cushioning. Sometimes, when there is damage to outer layers of these discs, the gel-like substance that is inside oozes out, breaching the outer wall. This type of hernia can put pressure on the nerves of the spinal column, causing pain.

 

Hernia Treatment

When a person seeks medical care for a suspected hernia, the diagnostic process typically involves first a physical exam; the doctor will check for swelling or a bulge in the abdomen or groin. Imaging tests, including X-rays or endoscopy, can help a physician see where there is a hernia, and how severe it is.

Initial treatment for hiatal hernia may be conservative, and involve monitoring and making lifestyle changes such as avoiding spicy foods and elevating the upper body during sleep.

Pharmacological solutions might involve antacids, proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) and H2 blockers, which reduce the production of stomach acids.

If these methods do not resolve symptoms of heartburn and reflux, then hernia surgery may be recommended. The most common type of hernia operation is called Nissen fundoplication, which involves wrapping the upper part of the stomach around the lower esophagus to reinforce the lower esophageal sphincter and prevent acid reflux. In some cases, minimally invasive techniques, such as laparoscopic hernia repair, may be used to reduce recovery time and minimize scarring.

Acupuncture and TCM may, in some cases, offer an alternative treatment for hiatal hernia that can help relieve pain, heartburn, and regurgitation.

 

Can Acupuncture Help Hiatal Hernia?

According to TCM theory, abdominal hernias usually occur due to an imbalance in the middle or lower jiao. The three jiaos are sometimes referred to or translated as the “triple burner,” which illustrates how they keep the center of the body warm and nourished.

In TCM, the upper jiao, middle jiao, and lower jiao correspond to the visceral structure of the midsection, and each one helps to control and harmonize the organ systems contained within it. The middle jiao houses the spleen, stomach, liver and gallbladder, while the lower jiao contains the small intestine, large intestine, kidneys, and bladder.

In Chinese Medicine, heat, cold, dampness, and dryness can be considered pathogenic forces that can cause problems. If there is an accumulation of cold or damp in the upper or lower abdomen, it can cause muscle weakness that leads to the formation of a hernia.

The middle jiao and lower jiao help keep fluids balanced in the abdomen. If the jiaos are not functioning well, then muscle weakness may be the result. Stagnant Qi can also be a factor. Acupuncture treatment helps to strengthen Qi and get it moving.

TCM takes the view that physical, mental, and emotional health are all inextricably linked. Strong emotions and stress can also contribute to the formation of hernias. Repressed feelings of anger or rage are associated with hiatal hernia. It is as if a person is swallowing those feelings, but the body rebels to force them back up.

Acupuncture treatment can help address the effects of prolonged stress and emotional upset. Finding stress relief and relaxation can have a significant effect on the central nervous system, the muscles of the abdomen, and the diaphragm. 

Both acupuncture treatment and Chinese herbs can help to reduce acid reflux and GERD symptoms.

If a hernia is severe, then a hernia operation may be required. In these cases, acupuncture and herbs can still help with the healing process. One study showed that electroacupuncture treatment helped to relieve postoperative pain for patients who had undergone hernia surgery.

Regular acupuncture treatment can help to prevent the recurrence of reflux, while helping to reduce the physical effects of emotional stress.

 

Acupuncture Near Me for Hiatal Hernia in Los Angeles

TCM is an excellent modality for helping to relieve both gastrointestinal disorders and muscular problems. In some cases, a hiatal hernia is a serious mechanical problem that requires surgical intervention. However, in many cases, hernias can be relieved with changes in lifestyle that will help to reduce acid and relieve stress. Acupuncture is worth considering as an adjunct or alternative hernia treatment.




*This article is for education from the perspective of Traditional Chinese Medicine only. The education provided by this article is not approved by FDA to diagnose, prevent, treat and cure human diseases. It should not stop you from consulting with your physician for your medical conditions. Traditional Chinese Medicine is based on Qi, which is an invisible force that usually cannot be observed by modern science. Because science focuses on testing ideas about the natural world with evidence obtained through observation, these aspects of acupuncture can’t be studied by science. Therefore acupuncture and Chinese herbs are often not supported by double-blind, randomized trials, and they are considered alternative medicine therapies in the United States.

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